Aggregates
Leslie Kavanaugh

ISBN: 978 90 814933 2 1
Collection of Essays,
separately available for download

Single essay:
5 euro; 2 euro (students)

Aggregates
Box collection

35 euro

  1. The Philosophical Foundations of Network Theory: The Reticulum
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  2. A Place to stand
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  3. Thinking/Making: Aristotle’s Notion of the Creative Intellect
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  4. Collectivity: Or, why can’t we just all get along?
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  5. Towards a Neo-Marxist Theory of Spatio-Temporality
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  6. Situating Situationism: Wandering Around New Babylon with Mille Plateaux
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  7. The Architect as Humanist
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  8. Brentano on Space
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  9. The Ontology of Dwelling
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  10. Architecture in the Age of Digital Representation
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  11. Wide Open (not Shut): from Surveillance to Sousveillance
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  12. Slave City vs. VrijStaat: A Tale of Two Cities....Part I
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  13. Time and the City
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  14. The Architectonic
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  15. When Music Becomes Noise
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  16. On the Aggregation and Unity of Monadic Substances
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  17. The Fold: A Plea for le pli
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  18. Book Review: Woud, Auke van der; Een Nieuwe Wereld: Het Ontstaan van het Moderne Nederland (A New world: the Evolution of Modern Netherlands)
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  19. The Architecture of the Embrace
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  20. A Philosophical Intertwining: Merleau-Ponty and Leibniz on Expression and Perception in Space
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Aggregates is a collection of essays that engage philosophical topics adjacent yet germane to architecture; namely, the questions: What is the nature of space and time? How do I as an individual inhabit space? What is my relationship to the world? As such, the works of various philosophers are examined, such as Plato, Aristotle, Heraclitus, Levinas, Heidegger, Brentano, Merleau-Ponty, Kant, Leibniz, Deleuze, Marx, Foucault, Negri-Hardt, Rousseau, Husserl, Horkheimer and Adorno, Baudrillard, and Benjamin. In the etymology of the Latin aggregatus, “to flock together”, aggregate also has the meaning of “to add onto”. To aggregate is to bring together, yet in a way that is the relationship of parts, as opposed to parts that form an inviolate whole. This aggregate, then, should be seen as similar, yet disparate; hanging together, yet autonomous. In this way, the collection of essays, Aggregates is a mere moment in time, a project not complete; indeed, impossible to complete, for the problems posed have no facile answers.


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